Robin Hood - furry

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lupercal's avatar
KF Animation Editor
Posts: 304
Reviews: 517

More than eight years on, Lonely Princess awards this movie the same rating I did. My 2004 review begins

'It's a bit hard to account for this film's enduring popularity. The conclusion I've reached is that it was Disney's only feature in recent memory that featured only bipedal anthro animals, that the main character was a fox, and that a lot of people like bipedal foxes and would enjoy a movie about them planting celery.'

After all this time I still believe that this movie is beloved because it features bipedal furries. Look at other Disney movies. There are quadruped furries in 'Lady and the Tramp', 'Fox and the Hound' , '101 Dalmatians', 'The Lion King', 'Bambi', 'Dumbo', and numerous DTV sequels, but few bipeds.  

A few days ago I was thinking, 'what are the furry bipedal movies?'

The first two I came up with were  'Fritz the Cat'  (72) and 'Robin Hood' (73)

There are earlier films with minor furry biped characters ('Pinocchio', for example), but it seems to me that in movies as opposed to TV series, furries are usually quadruped.

Loop

 

Neil's avatar
KF Web Animation Editor
Posts: 12
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I suppose it's because a bipedal furry may as well be a human character; the main advantage of animal characters is that they have more comedy value, hence their popularity in shorts. If you're investing in a full-length feature about cartoon animals, which needs a bit more depth, then it's better to emphasise their animal nature; making them bipedal can detract from this.

 

Major exception: cartoons about insects (Antz, A Bug's Life, Bee Movie) tend to make them bipedal.

J-Kitty's avatar
World Class Animation Critic
Posts: 16
Reviews: 188

RE : Robin Hood - furry

My picks are the furry versions of Tom Sawyer and David Copperfield

lupercal's avatar
KF Animation Editor
Posts: 304
Reviews: 517

Hi, Neil = nice to hear from you again. I don't quite buy that explanation, though. I've always thought it ironic that furry fandom is obsessively bipedal-centric to the point of decrying quadruped anthropomorphic characters (there is a wonderful cartoon by Jack Cavanaugh from the 90's - don't ask me where to find it: if I find I have it on the HD I'll post it - which has a quad furry character mournfully looking at the window of a 'furry club' which excludes quads with a legend something like 'Two-legs Good, Four-Legs Bad'. I'm paraphrashing it, but if he was aware of the Orwellian pun it makes it just about the most brilliant political furry cartoon I've ever seen. I met Jack in 98 but never asked him about it.

You may have noticed that I quoted 'Fritz the Cat' as the first major bipedal furry movie. It is also the most successful independant animated movie of all time. I don't buy that anthro biped characters may as well be humans and that this is somehow a commercial negative.  Well, consider this: if bipeds are almost vacant from movies, why are they almost UBIK in shorts (Bugs, Daffy, most WB characters, Tom and Jerry, Felix, Donald, Micky, Goofy yadda yadda)

 

Loop 

 

(I found it, but can't upload it)

lonely_princess's avatar
KF Animation Editor
Posts: 63
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meaning

what does ubik mean?

lupercal's avatar
KF Animation Editor
Posts: 304
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Hi, LP (BTW, have you been hit on by the Ice King lately? Laughing  Sorry ask Toonboy or any Adventure Time fan...)

I'm not sure if you mean 'what does UBIK mean' in the context of the book or in general. In general it means nothing. It's a made-up word by Philip K Dick. However in the context of the book (he also wrote a screenplay) it is a shorthand synonym for

 

SPOILERS

 

 

 

 

 

UBIQUITOUS (adjective):  having or seeming to have the ability to be everywhere at once; omnipresent

This is one definition. In the context of the book I would simplfy it to 'everywhere' or 'always'

 

 Loop

 

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